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New iOS threat can render your device unresponsive and forever useless.

New iOS threat can render your device unresponsive and forever useless.

If you use an Apple iPhone, iPad or other iDevice, now would be an excellent time to ensure that the machine is running the latest version of Apple’s mobile operating system — version 9.3.1. Failing to do so could expose your devices to automated threats capable of rendering them unresponsive and perhaps forever useless.

Reported earlier by respected security researcher Brian Krebs, Manually setting the date of your iPhone or iPad all the back to January. 1, 1970 will permanently brick the device (don’t try this at home, or against frenemies!).

Apple products like the iPad (and virtually all mass-market wireless devices) are designed to automatically connect to wireless networks they have seen before. They do this with a relatively weak level of authentication: If you connect to a network named “Hotspot” once, going forward your device may automatically connect to any open network that also happens to be called “Hotspot.”

For example, to use Starbuck’s free Wi-Fi service, you’ll have to connect to a network called “attwifi”. But once you’ve done that, you won’t ever have to manually connect to a network called “attwifi” ever again. The next time you visit a Starbucks, just pull out your iPad and the device automagically connects.

From an attacker’s perspective, this is a golden opportunity. Why? He only needs to advertise a fake open network called “attwifi” at a spot where large numbers of computer users are known to congregate. Using specialized hardware to amplify his Wi-Fi signal, he can force many users to connect to his (evil) “attwifi” hotspot. From there, he can attempt to inspect, modify or redirect any network traffic for any iPads or other devices that unwittingly connect to his evil network.

Read the full article at kerbsonsecurity.com/

Posted in: Network Security, Technology Trends

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Intel ends Tick-Tock processor release cycle

Intel ends Tick-Tock processor release cycle

For about a decade, the way in which Intel released new generations of processors was known and referred to as the Tick-Tock cycle. It’s a two year cycle, with the Tick reducing the size of the die, and the Tock being an optimization year where we see performance improvements and lower power chips, but the die size stays the same.

However, back in mid-2015, Intel admitted that its 10-nanometer technology was in rough shape and wouldn’t go into production at the end of the year as expected. Recentky it went ahead and officially declared “Tick-Tock” dead.

“We expect to lengthen the amount of time we will utilize out 14 [nanometer] and out next-generation 10 [nanometer] process technologies, further optimizing out products and process technologies while meeting the yearly market cadence for product introductions.”

The company even includes a visual aid to contrast the differences between the previous methodology and the current one:

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IMAGE CREDIT: INTEL.

Intel says that its third 14-nanometer product, known as Kaby Lake, will have “key performance advancements as compared to [its] 6th generation Core processor family.” The extent of these enhancements is clear, but leaks to the Web suggest enhancements to graphics and media.

Reposted from original Source

Posted in: Technology Trends

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Internet Explorer reaches “End of Life”

Internet Explorer reaches “End of Life”

Microsoft will be pulling the plug on Internet Explorer 8,9 and 10 next week. The company has announced a final patch which will deliver the last few bug fixes to Internet Explorer on January 12th 2016, as well as an “End of Life” notification telling users to upgrade to IE11 or Microsoft Edge. This should be no surprise since March 2015 IE has been deprecated, mostly sticking around for the sake of enterprise compatibility.

If you are still using Internet Explorer 8, 9 or 10 for your business applications contact CS2K to discuss your options including migrating your application or switching to a modern browser.

Source – Microsoft KB

Posted in: Network Security, Tech Tips for Business Owners, Technology Trends

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From a Tesla Model S owner in Tennessee

From a Tesla Model S owner in Tennessee

tesla_flag

I was driving home from work on the interstate in the right lane at approximately 70 miles per hour, following a truck. In the middle of the lane, there was a rusty three-pronged trailer hitch that was sticking up with the ball up in the air. The truck in front of me cleared the object. I did not have enough time to swerve to avoid the hitch, and it went below my car. I felt a firm “thud” as the hitch struck the bottom of the car, and it felt as though it even lifted the car up in the air. My assistant later found a gouge in the tarmac where the item scraped into the road. Somewhat shaken, I continued to drive.

About 30-45 seconds later, there was a warning on the dashboard display saying, “Car needs service. Car may not restart.” I continued to drive, hoping to get home. About one minute later, the message on the dashboard display read, “Please pull over safely. Car is shutting down.” I was able to fully control the car the entire time and safely pulled off the left shoulder on the side of the road. I got out of the car, and started to get all my belongings out. About 5-10 seconds after getting out of the car, smoke started to come from the front underbody of the car. I walked away from the vehicle to a distance of about 100 yards. More smoke started to come out of the bottom of the car, and about two minutes after I walked away, the front of the car caught on fire.

I am thankful to God that I was totally uninjured in any way from this impact. Had I not been in a Tesla, that object could have punched through the floor and caused me serious harm. From the time of impact of the object until the time the car caught fire was about five minutes. During this time, the car warned me that it was damaged and instructed me to pull over. I never felt as though I was in any imminent danger. While driving after I hit the object until I pulled over, the car performed perfectly, and it was a totally controlled situation. There was never a point at which I was anywhere even close to any flames.

The firemen arrived promptly and applied water to the flames. They were about to pry open the doors, so I pressed my key button and the handles presented and everything worked even though the front of the car was on fire. No flames ever reached the cabin, and nothing inside was damaged. I was even able to get my papers and pens out of the glove compartment.

This experience does not in any way make me think that the Tesla Model S is an unsafe car. I would buy another one in a heartbeat.

 

Re posted from Tesla Motors Blog

Posted in: Technology Trends

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